Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Proper use of "Esq."

Collapse
X
  •  
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Proper use of "Esq."

    This is not exactly an ethics question, but ...

    Is the use of the legal title "Esq." proper for both male and female attorneys ?

    Thanks.

  • #2
    Re: Proper use of "Esq."

    either...

    2. Abbr. Esq. Used as an honorific usually in its abbreviated form, especially after the name of an attorney or a consular officer: Jane Doe, Esq.; John Doe, Esq.
    3. In medieval times, a candidate for knighthood who served a knight as an attendant and a shield bearer.
    4. Archaic An English country gentleman; a squire.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Proper use of "Esq."

      Both males and females can use the term Esq. today. It is commonly used for attorneys to show that one is licensed to practice law. You can use "J.D." after your name after you graduate from law school and then "Esq." after you pass the bar. It is like "Dr." for people who have "M.D." degrees.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Proper use of "Esq."

        DISTRIBUTION

        It strikes me that learned counsel lacks the due diligence, attention to detail and capability to research "Esq". As a mere mortal and average citizen I applaud the constitutions prohibition (see Titles of Nobility Amendment and as detailed in Article 1. Section 8 of the Constitution of The United States. Further, the source document states).

        "No Title of Nobility shall be granted by the United States: And no Person holding any Office of Profit or Trust under them, shall, without the Consent of the Congress, accept of any present, Emolument, Office, or Title, of any kind whatever, from any King, Prince or foreign State."

        I just tell my staff not to hire any attorney that uses the "Esq" as it says the wrong thing about the individual. If they know what it means, then I don't want their services and if they don't know, well then they should and they haven't done their homework.

        Have a nice day. :-)

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Proper use of "Esq."

          Esq is commonly used and widely accepted.

          Has nothing to do with nobility.

          But hey do as you wish.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Proper use of "Esq."

            What a load of pretentious codswallop. Esq., is most definitely a British title of nobility, which has been simply 'assumed' by American solicitors.

            It is a complete pretention for an American to assume this title, and to somehow look down their noses at for instance a British Esquire who is using it in its correct context, since it has been most likely granted to him by his monarch.

            I hold a J.D. but more interestingly by ancestry I am entitled to be addressed as the "Much Honored so & so of such a place." In the UK I might well receive a letter from the Palace calling me J. Bloggs, Esq., that title would of course have nothing to do with my qualification. It is quite ludicrous for Americans to have simply 'assumed' this title as their own and to suddenly expect the British to amend their historical and heraldic customs which date to the Norman Conquests.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Proper use of "Esq."

              Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
              Esq is commonly used and widely accepted.

              Has nothing to do with nobility.

              But hey do as you wish.
              Quite wrong!

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Proper use of "Esq."

                Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
                This is not exactly an ethics question, but ...

                Is the use of the legal title "Esq." proper for both male and female attorneys ?

                Thanks.

                Technically no. Some US females wrongly assume this title, but it is a male title of British origin, which is to do with gentry and not occupation.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Proper use of "Esq."

                  It's interesting that the legislative bodies that make the laws are predominately lawyers. The laws of an individual state dictate what indications particular professions may use, such as "M.D." for a doctor, "D.D.S" for a dentist, or "P.E." for professional engineeer. However, these lawyer filled legislative bodies haven't seen fit to establish the appropriate honorific for themselves.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Proper use of "Esq."

                    In researching the proper title to be used in corresponding with practicing attorneys-at-law, I came across this dribble. The discussion clearly reflects why the class of attorneys in the USA is considered to be pompous and self-serving. What a lot of crap!

                    “First thing we do, let’s kill all the lawyers.” [Shakespeare, King Henry VI, Part II, IV, ii] would probably not result in chaos as is the general interpretation but in a sense of freedom the world has not known for quite some time. Global warming and the financial crises would end, too, once the lawyers shut up and stopped manipulating society.

                    Cheers!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Proper use of "Esq."

                      Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
                      DISTRIBUTION

                      It strikes me that learned counsel lacks the due diligence, attention to detail and capability to research "Esq". As a mere mortal and average citizen I applaud the constitutions prohibition (see Titles of Nobility Amendment and as detailed in Article 1. Section 8 of the Constitution of The United States. Further, the source document states).

                      "No Title of Nobility shall be granted by the United States: And no Person holding any Office of Profit or Trust under them, shall, without the Consent of the Congress, accept of any present, Emolument, Office, or Title, of any kind whatever, from any King, Prince or foreign State."

                      I just tell my staff not to hire any attorney that uses the "Esq" as it says the wrong thing about the individual. If they know what it means, then I don't want their services and if they don't know, well then they should and they haven't done their homework.

                      Have a nice day. :-)

                      what a ******bag. who would want to work for you anyway?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Proper use of "Esq."

                        The term is an honorific, and it should only be used when addressing another. It is inappropriate for one to affix either "Esquire" or "Esq." to his or her own name.

                        Those who exalt themselves should be humbled.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Proper use of "Esq."

                          It is frankly no different than adding "Attorney at Law" after your name, if you are a lawyer.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Proper use of "Esq."

                            If I may be so bold as to add to this thread, I would like to state, quite simply, the fact that I (with no legal training) am entitled to the title "esquire", as the eldest son of the eldest son of a holder of a commission under HM the Queen's Sign-Manual. I am further a grandson of a Companion of the Order of Australia (an Order of Knighthood) and the great-grandson of a Member of the Order of the British Empire (a further Order of Knighthood). Perhaps most importantly, however, I am a subject of the Crown (a triple Australian, British, and American citizen), and the son of a British citizen who owns or has owned land direct from the Crown (i.e. in freehold). I am entitled to the title esquire as it is not a noble title. It is a position in the gentry which means nothing more than an attendant of Her Majesty or of a Knight, or a descent from one of those two, and signifies land-ownership, not noble birth.

                            In reply to that ridiculous idea that the Unregistered Guest is a "Much Honored so and so of such-and-such", I would ask that person if they are quite sane. If that person was a Marquess in the United Kingdom, he would never be addressed as Esquire, and would be quite sure of his territorial designation. One is not simply "the Much Hon.". In fact, even if he held the title purely by courtesy, as the eldest son of a Duke, he would be addressed as the Hon. Joe Bloggs, never Joe Bloggs, Esq.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Proper use of "Esq."

                              hmmm...interesting

                              Comment

                              Previously entered content was automatically saved. Restore or Discard.
                              Auto-Saved
                              Big Grin :D Frown :( Embarrassment :o Confused :confused: Smile :) Stick Out Tongue :p Wink ;) Mad :mad: Roll Eyes (Sarcastic) :rolleyes: Cool :cool: EEK! :eek:
                              x
                              Insert: Thumbnail Small Medium Large Fullsize Remove  
                              x

                              Do cats say meow or mooo?... (write the answer twice with an "@" between the words)

                              widgetinstance 213 (Related Topics) skipped due to lack of content & hide_module_if_empty option.
                              Working...
                              X